This blog is about exploring and sharing all the ways teachers and innovators creatively use technology to enhance education.

Adam Hill on Google Apps for Education

Adam Hill on Google Apps for Education

Students use Google. Do teachers use Google too?

 

Of course! But teachers do not simply use Google for searching. They use Google to educate.

 

Adam Hill is a primary teacher from the UK, currently teaching in a bilingual school in Hong Kong. Adam has integrated Google Apps for Education (now called G Suite) to enhance his students’ learning experience.  He is now a Level 2 Google Certified Educator.

He learned to use Google's Apps for teaching when he attended the Ed Tech Team Global Summit conference over a year ago. Since then, he revolutionized his teaching with the power of the web.

Adam Hill. Primary teacher in the UK and passionate user of Google Apps for Education in the classroom. 

Adam Hill. Primary teacher in the UK and passionate user of Google Apps for Education in the classroom. 

 

Online Collaboration and Beyond

 

Adam notes that one of the best things about Google apps is the opportunity for online collaboration. Different users can simultaneously access and edit files in Google Documents, Sheets, Forms, etc. Google Classroom provides an online platform for students and teachers to accomplish tasks, give feedback, and become more efficient in the learning process. Google's Apps make sharing, collaboration, peer-evaluation, and discussions much easier. Furthermore, the apps are very accessible to use because they can be installed in mobile phones and tablets.

 

Students using a collaborative Google Doc to debate whether or not Pokémon Go should be banned.

Students using a collaborative Google Doc to debate whether or not Pokémon Go should be banned.

Learning to be a Responsible Techie

 

With so many great features it can become overwhelming when using Google Apps for the first time. Sometimes students can misuse these tools by accidentally rearranging or deleting other student's work. Adam teaches about is most important icon – the great UNDO button. one of the greater challenges in using online and real-time collaboration is for students to become honest and responsible. Google addressed these issues by tracking revisions which can be checked by teachers anytime. Thus, this provides an opportunity for students to learn better digital citizenship within the classroom. Adam has a strong belief that students should learn to become digital citizens in primary school using digital tools that can be monitored or controlled. Then, when they reach their teenage and adult years they will be more prepared to positively interact on social media. 

Students using a collaborative Google My Maps to plot time zones and color code them.

Students using a collaborative Google My Maps to plot time zones and color code them.

With the constant development of Google apps, the possibilities of using them in education are endless. Teachers and students continue to harness these free tools in productive ways to make learning easier, interactive, and responsible. 

Be sure to take a look at Adam's Blog and connect with him on Facebook and Twitter. He's actively involved in sharing, learning and growing in educational technology so don't miss your chance to connect with this innovator!

 

Helpful links and resources related to this interview:

Adam’s blog: https://mrhillmusings.wordpress.com/

Adam on Twitter: @AhillAdam

Adam’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AhillAdam/

Adam’s blog post on Google apps: https://mrhillmusings.wordpress.com/category/google/

Google for Education Training for Educators: https://edutrainingcenter.withgoogle.com/training

Blog of Alice Keeler, author of book on Google Classroom: http://alicekeeler.com/

Christine Pinto’s blog on Google Apps for Education for primary-aged students: http://christinepinto.com/gafe-4-littles-pln/

 

Tom Mullaney on Digital BreakoutEDU

Tom Mullaney on Digital BreakoutEDU

Sean Robinson on Connections-Based Learning

Sean Robinson on Connections-Based Learning